Small Animal Fair

Nevada Cooperative Extension and 4-H will be providing incredible exhibitions and competitions at the Logandale Fall Festival. Check out the information on this page for schedules, how to register and what 4-H is all about!

OVERVIEW OF 4H EVENTS AT LOGANDALE FALL FESTIVAL

1. DEMONSTRATION CONTEST
Cloverbud, Junior, Intermediate, Senior

The purpose of this event is to develop the ability of members to communicate an idea or topic by showing, telling, or expressing your opinion.

A demonstration:

  1. Is doing.
  2. Is showing how. As you show how, you tell how.
  3. Is where you make something or do something. There is a final product.

Posters and Slides:

  1. A minimum of four posters or slides should be used. Additional posters or slides are acceptable and encouraged to effectively support your presentation. If double sided boards are used, they count as two posters.
  2. The posters should address the following points:
    • Introduction / Title
    • Materials
    • Process
    • Summary
  3. Visual Aids: Visual aids are encouraged. Product labels should be limited to generic names and product names should be covered. The work area and table space used for the presentation should be used to the speaker’s best advantage.
  4. Length: The presentation can range in length from three minutes for an individual primary presentation to 15 minutes for a senior individual or team presentation. The complexity of the topic and the age of participants should dictate the appropriate length. Exceeding 15 minutes in length does not result in disqualification but will be considered when evaluating the presentation.
  5. Number of Presenters: An individual presentation is delivered by one speaker. A team presentation is delivered by up to three speakers. Team members should divide work and speaking parts equally. An uneven distribution of work or speaking parts will impact the evaluation. They are evaluated as a team.
  6. Questions: Only evaluators may ask questions. Time for questions may be limited.
  7. Note Cards: Speakers may not use notes. Posters and/or visual aids should provide any necessary prompting.
  8. Attire: Appropriate attire for the occasion. Costumes may be used.

Other: Speakers are strongly encouraged to relate the presentation to their current 4-H project work or 4-H activities or spark. If the speaker is questioned concerning the relation of the presentation to a 4-H activity and the presentation is not based on a 4-H activity, the speaker should connect the presentation to a club, project based 4-H presentation program, or 4-H experience.

Prizes will include:
Cloverbud- Participation prize
Juniors- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes
Intermediates- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes
Seniors- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes

2. EDUCATIONAL DISPLAY
Cloverbud, Junior, Intermediate, Senior

The purpose of this contest is to allow members to organize a visual presentation of a program or a concept.

An educational display is an organized visual presentation of a program or a concept. A display should be designed to convey its message in a limited amount of time.

  • Posters: Educational Displays may exhibit one of the following display formats:
    • Card Table Display (approximately 30”x30”): This format will feature a tri-fold poster board that includes a title, the member’s name and 4-H affiliation, and a depiction of the program or concept. The table may be used as part of the display. Must provide own table if one is needed.
    • Panel Display (approximately 4’x4’): The panel is presented vertically on an easel. The display will include; as a minimum, a title, the member’s name and 4-H affiliation, and a depiction of the program or concept. Must provide own easel if one is needed.
  • Visual Aids: Display items that are added to the table of an educational display should be kept to a minimum and only included if they are practical to place on the display surface itself. Items must be clearly labeled and self-explanatory. All lettering and visual depictions on the displays will be understandable or readable by an average adult from no less than a four foot distance.
  • An individual presentation is done by one member.

Prizes will include:
Cloverbud- Participation prize
Juniors- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes
Intermediates- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes
Seniors- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes

3. PREPARED PUBLIC SPEAKING
Senior and Intermediate Division

The purpose of this contest is to allow members to help members to organize and present ideas, opinions and information, in a logical and persuasive manner. They are building confidence in self- expression. They are taking responsibility for the most important skill of adult life – communication.

Description: An original speech specifically related to participant’s life experience.

Title: “My life experience… A Pathway to the Future”

  1. Speech must be original and related to participant’s life experiences.
  2. Contestants may not use any costumes, posters, visual aids, or props for their presentation.
  3. Three copies of the talks are to be furnished for the judges, but contestants are not allowed to present any other items to the judges.
  4. Each speech will be timed and must be between 6-8 minutes for seniors and between 4-6 minutes for intermediates. Two points will be deducted for each thirty seconds over or under the time limit.
  5. Contestants may use notes. However, excessive use of notes may be counted against the contestant. This will be at the discretion of the judges.
  6. A podium must be used by participants.

Prizes will include:
Intermediates- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes
Seniors- 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes

4. RABBIT SHOWMANSHIP
Cloverbud, Junior, Intermediate, Senior

The purpose of this contest is to allow the member to competitively demonstrate their knowledge and skill in raising, conditioning, evaluating, and handling rabbits. Participants gain experience in following oral instructions, speaking before an audience, and reacting to problem situations.

Showmanship Steps

  1. Carry rabbit to judging table or removing rabbit from cage.
  2. Properly pose your rabbit.
  3. Examine your rabbit in the following order. Tell your judge what you are looking for.
    1. Ears- Check for:
      1. Ear canker; Illegible or missing tattoo; Size and carriage of ears; Torn or missing part of ear
    2. Eyes – Check for:
      1. Conjunctivitis; Wall eye (white cornea); Spots on eyes; Mismatched eye color; Runny or weepy eyes c.
    3. Nose – Check for:
      1. Snuffles (white nasal discharge)
    4. Teeth – Check for:
      1. Malocclusion (buck or wolf teeth); Simple malocclusion (butting teeth); Broken or missing tooth
    5. Chin/Neck Area – Check for:
      1. Dewlap (does); Abscesses
    6. Front Legs – Check for:
      1. Bent, bowed or deformed
    7. Front Feet and Toenails – Check for:
      1. Missing toenails (5 on each front foot), including dewclaw; Broken toenails (too short to determine color); Unmatched toenails; Nail color not meeting breed standard
    8. Abdomen – Check for:
      1. Mastitis or swollen teats; Tumor, rupture or hernia; Abscesses
    9. Hind Legs – Check for:
      1. Bent, bowed, deformed, or severely cow hocked
    10. Hocks – Check for:
      1. Sore hocks (bloody)
    11. Hind Feet and Toenails – Check for:
      1. Missing toenails (4 on each hind foot); Broken toenails (too short to determine color); Unmatched toenails Nail color not meeting breed standard
    12. Sex – Check for:
      1. Vent disease; Missing testicle(s) on Senior Buck; Junior Buck with only one testicle showing; split penis
    13. Tail – Check for:
      1. Stub, broken or wry tail

To the Rabbit Showman: The procedures in this guide outline various ways to perform showmanship. Please note that there may be more than one proper way to show a certain item and that it is important that you, the member, decide which way is easiest for you. The judge may or may not ask you to show something specific on the rabbit. Judging can be done individually or by age group depending on the judge’s preferences. When there are only a few showman or the judge is having difficulty arriving at a decision, the showman may be asked to take part in a more intensified showmanship experience. This usually includes properly removing the rabbit from a cage, switching rabbits with another showman or answering more questions. All questions asked will come from basic 4-H knowledge and from the A.R.B.A. Standard of Perfection. Questions can be about any rabbit breed and may include definitions. It is very important to make sure that the member turns the rabbit so that the judge does not have to strain to see the actions of the showman. Most importantly, the member is to keep his or her eyes on only the judge and his or her rabbit. Don’t watch the other showman.

5. POULTRY SHOWMANSHIP
Cloverbud, Junior, Intermediate, Senior

The purpose of these contests is to allow the member to competitively demonstrate their knowledge and skill in raising, conditioning, evaluating, and handling poultry. Participants gain experience in following oral instructions, speaking before an audience, and reacting to problem situations.
Procedure

  1. Introduce yourself
    1. You should say your name, age, the 4-H club you are in, the sex of your bird, how old your bird is. Then tell the judge the class, breed, and variety that your bird is. Share any interesting history or facts about the breed/variety.
  2. Remove bird from exhibition coop.
    1. Always head first with one hand over back, the other under body with fingers around legs.
  3. Hold the bird.
    1. Pick up bird by spreading your fingers and placing your hand palm up under the bird’s breast as it faces you. As your palm touches the breast, you will find that the bird’s legs will be between your fingers. As you lift the bird, gently grasp the legs by closing the fingers. You can now lift the bird without having it squirm and fight
  4. Examine head.
    1. Hold head of bird alert by prodding at the region of the wattles.
  5. Examine wings.
    1. Open either wing with free hand. To open the other wing, merely pass hand, palm up, over to that side. Grasp wing bow and fan out wing. (There is no need to transfer bird to other hand.)
  6. Examine body.
    1. Over back, on breast and body.
  7. Examine tail plumage.
    1. Give the tail piece a quick flip up· and down.
  8. Examine shanks and feet.
    1. Place free hand on back of bird. Turn bird upside down. Back of bird should rest in the palm of the hand
  9. Examine body.
    1. Hold as in No. 7
  10. Hand bird to judge.
    1. Head first.
  11. Return bird to coop.
    1. Head first.
  12. Return to position by the coop.
    1. Keep your bird on the alert until judge has made a decision.

6. NON-MARKET GOAT SHOWMANSHIP
Cloverbud, Junior, Intermediate, Senior

The purpose of these contests is to allow the member to competitively demonstrate their knowledge and skill in raising, conditioning, evaluating, and handling goats. Participants gain experience in following oral instructions, speaking before an audience, and reacting to problem situations.

This contest is for goats that will not be competing in the market goat class in the Clark County Junior Livestock Show in April, 2018.

Showmanship Steps

  1. Evaluate the show ring prior to showmanship, paying close attention to where low spots are located. You want to make sure your goat’s front feed don’t end up in the low spots. You always want to set the goat going uphill.
  2. Hold the collar with your right hand palm up.
    1. Enter the ring going clockwise. Lead the goat from the left side with the right hand when possible. Keep the goat between you and the judge. Keep the goat’s front shoulder even with your leg and the goat’s head in front of your body. Showmen should hold the collar using their right hand palm facing upward and toward the goat’s head. Showman should let their left arm and hand relax at their side. There is no need for the showman to place their left arm behind their back.
  3. Pull tail lightly to encourage the goat to move.
    1. If you must encourage the goat to lead by pulling its tail, change hands and hold the collar with the left hand, lightly pull the tip of the goat’s tail with the right. As the goat begins moving, change your hands to their original position.
  4. Keep just enough space between you and the animal in front of you. You don’t want to crowd but yet you don’t want too much space either.
    1. If the judge pulls you into line, your goat’s shoulder should line up with the shoulder of the first goat in line. Keep your goat parallel to the other goats. If the judge lines you up to head-to-tail, always line up straight behind the goat at the front of the line. KEEP THE LINES STRAIGHT- this will make it easier for the judge to evaluate and compare goats.
  5. Goat is properly set with all four legs square underneath him. Showman is attentive to where the judge is at and does not block the view of the animal.
    1. A goat’s feet should be placed on the four corners of its body, and the goat should not stand too wide or narrow on either the front or the back legs. On the profile, goats should not have their hind legs pulled forward too far underneath them or stretched backward too far behind them. Keep the goat’s head straight over its body. The goat should look eye appealing and alert. You should remain standing at all times.
  6. Know where the judge is and stay alert. The judge may handle your goat at any moment or ask you to move to another place in the show ring. Moving goats from one point to another is just as important as correct positioning of their feet and bracing. When a judge asks a showman to move to another location, take the most direct path available. Goats should be turned slightly and pushed out of line if on a rear-view or pushed out of line before proceeding to the desired location with the goat between the showman and judge. Do not push the goat straight back or it will think you are signaling it to brace, and it will not move backward as desired. The showman should maintain eye contact with the judge while occasionally looking at the desired destination. When the showman is required to change sides, he/she must move around the front of the goat always facing the animal (Figure 5). Never change hands behind your back. Do not step behind the goat.

7. ANIMAL COSTUME CONTEST
Cloverbud, Junior, Intermediate, Senior

The purpose of these contests is to allow the member to competitively demonstrate their creativity, showmanship, and originality. Participants gain experience in following oral instructions, speaking before an audience, and reacting to problem situations.

Judges, and Judging criteria
This contest will have three judges.

Judges will choose winners based on showmanship, humor, originality, design & color, tasteful and creative presentation. Use your imagination! Homemade costumes are often the best. Even if you want to get a store-bought costume, doctor it up to make it your own and WIN!

Contest Rules

Entrant must register to be in the costume parade. All animals must be checked into the Logandale Fall Festival prior to the festival beginning.

Costumes must be safe for animals, contestants, and people watching. Animals may not be dyed or painted. Costumes considered being hazardous, toxic, or offensive by the 4-H staff or event judge will NOT be allowed.

Entrants must fill out a form with name, contact information and a description of your animal and the costume clearly written. The MC will announce your animal and to be included in our winners’ publicity. Be sure to fill out the form.

  • Animals must be leashed/held/under control at all times.
  • Each animal must have his/her own 4-H member walker.
  • Entrants must gather at the show ring at least 15 minutes prior to the start contest.
  • The judges’ decisions are final.

SCHEDULE

REGISTER

To  register to participate in the Small Animal Fair at the Logandale Fall Festival, click here to download/print and submit the Registration Form.

Keep in mind these rules before submitting a Registration Form:

All decisions by the judges will be final. Only 4-H members participating in the event may challenge or question a score or placement. Parents, leaders, 4-H staff may not challenge.

4-H Official Dress
Participants in all events must wear official NV State 4-H dress attire which includes a plain white, long-sleeved, collared, with full front button-up or snap shirt; a green 4-H collar, tie, or scarf around the neck; black pants and closed-toe shoes.

4-H Age Divisions Ages as of January 1, 2017 Cloverbuds: 5 to 8 Years Old* Juniors 9 to 10: Years Old Intermediates: 11 to 13 Years Old Seniors 14 to 19: Years Old All contests will be divided according to youth age groups as shown above. If a lack of entries warrant, classes may be combined at the discretion of the show management.
*Note about Clover Buds: Clover Buds (children ages 5-8) are invited to participate in various 4-H activities during the fair. These activities are intended to be a learning experience and the participants will not be judged one against the other. All Clover Buds will be given like awards for their participation as per the 4-H National Clover Bud Policy. If you have any questions about this policy please call the local 4-H office at 702-397-2604

Rabbits, Poultry, Non-Market Goats
Rabbits, Poultry, and all other animals must be penned at the festival for the duration of the event and must be preregistered with the 4-H staff. All entries into the 4-H area of the Logandale Fall Festival must be calm and not exhibiting signs of fear, anxiety, or any health issues. Please work with your animals before the fair to help offset this. All animals must be checked in on Thursday, October 19 or before 10:00 am on Friday, October 20, 2017.

Completed registration forms due no later than October 9, 2017

Mail/email/deliver to:
Northeast Clark County 4-H c/o Dianna Walker
PO Box 126
Logandale, NV 89021
walkerd@unce.unr.edu

An EEO/AA institution Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance must call or notify Dianna Walker at least three days prior to the scheduled event.

ABOUT 4H

The small animal fair at the Logandale Fall Festival is part of the East Clark County 4-H Program. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills.

4-H began a century ago as an educational program for the nation’s rural youth. Today, 4-H meets the needs of and engages young people in positive youth development experiences. 4-H is the youth development education program of University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. 4-H is the largest out-of-school youth organization in the United States with over 7 million members. There are over 49,000 young people engaged in 4-H programs across the state of Nevada. The 4-H program promotes life skills development through an expanding number of delivery modes: 4-H community and project clubs, military and 4-H Afterschool programs; special interest groups; school enrichment; camping and more.

4-H participants are all youth, ages 5 to 19, taking part in programs provided as the result of actions planned and initiated by Cooperative Extension personnel in cooperation with volunteers. 4-H is characterized as being community centered, volunteer led, extension staff supervised, research based, home and family oriented, publicly and privately funded and responsive to change. It offers youth opportunities in communications, leadership, career development, citizenship, healthy living, science, technology, engineering and math and more.

The local Cooperative Extension office in your county can help you to find a local club or program that’s right for you. It’s also easy to start a new club with some of your friends or other interested young people and a few adults who are willing to help. We look forward to working with and serving youth!